March 19th, 2018
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Theodosia Browning investigates a Charleston steeped in tradition and treachery

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How far would you go to get justice for the one you love?

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The trick is to marry for love—a task easier said than done!

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They are part of an elite unit. On task. Off grid.

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True love deserves a second chance . . . .

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Shocking evidence hits close to home...

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Elizabeth Hoyt | Muses on Detours in Life and in Writing


I’m writing my sixth historical book now—the third in The Legend of the Four Soldiers series—and already I’ve gone off my writing map. Writers generally fall into two groups: ones who plot out their story before they begin writing and those who wing it. I’m in the former camp, but here’s the thing: no matter how meticulously I plot before I write, no matter how much I try to foresee all eventualities, I always end up making detours from my plot.

Detours, in writing as in life, are sometimes frustrating (How do I get back on the main road?) sometimes confusing (Can I get back to the main road?) but usually interesting, and sometimes revolutionary.





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