September 15th, 2019
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THE WONDER OF NOW

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A deadly poisoning, a stolen painting and a criminal mastermind challenge the skills of Sharpe and Donovan


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Opposites attract in this gilded age historical romance when a young American suffragette eschews marriage until a handsome detective is hired to protect her from a dangerous stalker.


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The CDCs Outbreak Task Force director is on the hunt for a killershe doesn't need the distraction of her bodyguard!


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When missing turns to murdered, one woman's search for answers will take her to a place she never wanted to go


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Where do you go when you're at the end of your rope?


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The men of BOLO Consultants uncover a dangerous enemy in the City of Sin.



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Deanna Raybourn | Writer’s Passion

As a writer of historical fiction, I am frequently asked about research. Specifically, readers—and aspiring writers—want to know if it is necessary for me to visit the sites I write about. On this point I always give a firm and unequivocal yes. And no. Contradictory, I know, but hear me out. Developing a historical novel means creating a dual setting; it means creating a specific time and place for your reader to inhabit. They are a tourist in your world, and you must give them a guidebook of essential details to help them get around. In order to do that, you have to know the neighborhood at least as well as they do—and preferably better!

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