August 17th, 2019
Home | Log in!

On Top Shelf
THE BEWILDERED BRIDETHE BEWILDERED BRIDE
Fresh Pick
Todays_Pick
A WEB OF SILK

Reviewer Application

New Books This Week

Latest Articles


Sizzling August Reads

Slideshow image


Since your web browser does not support JavaScript, here is a non-JavaScript version of the image slideshow:

slideshow image
A blue-blood grandmother and her black-sheep granddaughter discover they are truly two sides of the same coin.


slideshow image
on Sale for 99Ę


slideshow image
Responsibility isnít just a word. Itís his Code of Honor. But she's a challenge!


slideshow image
Coming of Age is tough


slideshow image
It only takes one night


slideshow image
Can she forgive him?


Jackie Ormes
Nancy Goldstein

The First African American Woman Cartoonist

University of Michigan Press
March 2008
On Sale: February 21, 2008
240 pages
ISBN: 047211624X
EAN: 9780472116249
Hardcover
$35.00
Add to Wish List

Non-Fiction

In the United States at mid-century, in an era when there were few opportunities for women in general and even fewer for African American women, Jackie Ormes blazed a trail as a popular artist with the major black newspapers of the day.

Jackie Ormes chronicles the life of this multiply talented, fascinating woman who became a successful commercial artist and cartoonist. Ormes's cartoon characters (including Torchy Brown, Candy, and Patty-Jo 'n' Ginger) delighted readers of newspapers such as the Pittsburgh Courier and Chicago Defender, and spawned other products, including fashionable paper dolls in the Sunday papers and a black doll with her own extensive and stylish wardrobe. Ormes was a member of Chicago's Black elite in the postwar era, and her social circle included the leading political figures and entertainers of the day. Her politics, which fell decidedly to the left and were apparent to even a casual reader of her cartoons and comic strips, eventually led to her investigation by the FBI.

The book includes a generous selection of Ormes's cartoons and comic strips, which provide an invaluable glimpse into U.S. culture and history of the 1937-56 era as interpreted by Ormes. Her topics include racial segregation, cold war politics, educational equality, the atom bomb, and environmental pollution, among other pressing issues of the times.

"I am so delighted to see an entire book about the great Jackie Ormes! This is a book that will appeal to multiple audiences: comics scholars, feminists, African Americans, and doll collectors. . . ." ---Trina Robbins, author of A Century of Women Cartoonists and The Great Women Cartoonists

Nancy Goldstein became fascinated in the story of Jackie Ormes while doing research on the Patty-Jo Doll. She has published a number of articles on the history of dolls in the United States and is an avid collector.

Media Buzz

All Things Considered - July 31, 2008

Comments

No comments posted.

Registered users may leave comments.
Log in or register now!

© 2003-2019 off-the-edge.net  all rights reserved Privacy Policy