January 16th, 2018
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THE ONES WHO GOT AWAY

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New Year, New Books to love in January

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Someone in London is cooking up murder


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How much would you risk to turn your life around?


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RT TOP PICK! What if your prime suspects in a hefty art theft are two men you simply can't resist?


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In Nashville the music is louder, the dreams are bigger, and love can bring a cowboy to his knees.


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A broken promise, a terrifying legacy



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Also by Azar Nafisi:

Things I've Been Silent About: Memories, January 2009
Hardcover
Reading Lolita in Tehran, November 2008
Trade Size
Reading Lolita in Tehran, December 2003
Paperback (reprint)

Reading Lolita in Tehran
Azar Nafisi

Random House
December 2003
384 pages
ISBN: 081297106X
Paperback (reprint)
$14.95
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Non-Fiction Memoir

"We all have dreams - things we fantasize about doing and generally never get around to. This is the story of Azar Nafisi's dream and of the nightmare that made it come true." "For two years before she left Iran in 1997, Nafisi gathered seven young women at her house every Thursday morning to read and discuss forbidden works of Western literature. They were all former students whom she had taught at university. Some came from conservative and religious families, others were progressive and secular; several had spent time in jail. They were shy and uncomfortable at first, unaccustomed to being asked to speak their minds, but soon they began to open up and to speak more freely, not only about the novels they were reading but also about themselves, their dreams and disappointments. Their stories intertwined with those they were reading - Pride and Prejudice, Washington Square, Daisy Miller and Lolita - their Lolita, as they imagined her in Tehran." Nafisi's account flashes back to the early days of the revolution, when she first started teaching at the University of Tehran amid the swirl of protests and demonstrations. In those frenetic days, the students took control of the university, expelled faculty members and purged the curriculum. When a radical Islamist in Nafisi's class questioned her decision to teach The Great Gatsby, which he saw as an immoral work that preached falsehoods of "the Great Satan," she decided to let him put Gatsby on trial and stood as the sole witness for the defense.

Media Buzz

Good Morning America - February 12, 2007

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