May 24th, 2020
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BLACKBIRD RISING
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He's a kidnapper for hire...and he's just caught her.


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For all no-mercy heroines over forty. It’s Not Too Late.


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Read the Wild, Wild Regency everyone is talking about.


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Garrett had an irresistible charm and Julia knew she was headed for trouble.


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A perfect Mother’s Day story - free on KindleUnlimited


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When missing turns to murdered, one woman’s search for answers will take her to a place she never wanted to go…


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Opposites resist—and attract—under the Cancún sun


Dear Girls
Ali Wong

Random House
October 2019
On Sale: October 15, 2019
240 pages
ISBN: 052550883X
EAN: 9780525508830
Kindle: B07PZ4H1N2
Hardcover / e-Book
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Humor

Ali Wong’s heartfelt and hilarious letters to her daughters (the two she put to work while they were still in utero) cover everything they need to know in life, like the unpleasant details of dating, how to be a working mom in a male-dominated profession, and how she trapped their dad.

In her hit Netflix comedy special Baby Cobra, an eight-month pregnant Ali Wong resonated so strongly that she even became a popular Halloween costume. Wong told the world her remarkably unfiltered thoughts on marriage, sex, Asian culture, working women, and why you never see new mom comics on stage but you sure see plenty of new dads.

The sharp insights and humor are even more personal in this completely original collection. She shares the wisdom she’s learned from a life in comedy and reveals stories from her life off stage, including the brutal single life in New York (i.e. the inevitable confrontation with erectile dysfunction), reconnecting with her roots (and drinking snake blood) in Vietnam, tales of being a wild child growing up in San Francisco, and parenting war stories. Though addressed to her daughters, Ali Wong’s letters are absurdly funny, surprisingly moving, and enlightening (and gross) for all.

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