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New Girl in Little Cove

New Girl in Little Cove, May 2021
by Damhnait Monaghan

Graydon House
Featuring: Rachel O’Brien
384 pages
ISBN: 1525811509
EAN: 9781525811500
Kindle: B089GVH8JT
Trade Size / e-Book
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"A creative story about fitting in and making a difference"

Fresh Fiction Review

New Girl in Little Cove
Damhnait Monaghan

Reviewed by Sandra Wurman
Posted May 9, 2021

Women's Fiction | Small Town | Humor

There are times when a story just touches you. Funny, endearing, and essentially rather simple. Life in Little Cove is simple. What it lacks in numbers it excels in characters. In the NEW GIRL IN LITTLE COVE, the author Damhnait Monaghan immerses the reader in the traditions, language, and humanity of a very small community in Newfoundland. The first thing you will learn is how to pronounce Newfoundland. Without that skill, you will forever be seen as a mainlander. And Rachel O’Brien immediately realizes that maintaining that division will not grant her any favors with the people she meets and teaches in Little Cove.

First off is a warning. Tread lightly through the beginning chapter or so until you get a feel for the language which is English but not like anything you’ve ever heard. I realized that just like in some of the British humor I’ve learned to covet, NEW GIRL IN LITTLE COVE is about people that have grown up with a unique way with words.

For those who seldom stray from their hometown dialects are almost traditions and part of the culture of many places. When I first moved from New Jersey to Pittsburgh Pennsylvania I was sure I had landed somewhere unique. Then after living there for over a decade some of those idioms had become part of my unconscious speech. I got it. You will too and once it sinks in this amazing book just may become one of your favorites.

Tough moving into a position teaching French to teenagers many of whom have no desire to learn. Part of that comes from family pressure to learn something that has employment value. Especially important in a small town with scant possibilities. Little Cove is a lot like many small towns where kids wait for the time when they can move on and make their mark.

Some folks stay because of family obligations. But all find their way – in their own way. And Rachel O’Brien is finding her way. Success in her classroom is a challenge. But when it happens it is glorious. Rachel’s position is for one year. She initially wound up in Little Cove having missed openings closer to where she lived. Moving to Little Cove was a way to get a fresh start. Life had beaten Rachel down. After her father’s death, both Rachel and her mother needed a way out of their sadness and grief. Her mom took a long-revered sabbatical. Rachel answered an ad and found herself in a strange new place.

The language was the first indication that Rachel had landed somewhere that might not work out so well, but it was only for one year. Rachel needed to find ways to fit in but so far, she was a walking disaster when it came to communication. Funny since language was her specialty. Well, French at least. Newfoundland talk was a different animal. In some ways a shortened speech, missed syllables. In other cases filled to overflow with excess baggage. In either case glorious even if difficult to translate. Her first notice was her own name. O’Brien became O’Brine.

Through Rachel we get a chance to meet some amazing characters in NEW GIRL IN LITTLE COVE. NEW GIRL IN LITTLE COVE is the breakout novel by Damhnait Monaghan. Monaghan used a combination of memories and creative genius to create this world. Midstream you feel right at home. NEW GIRL IN LITTLE COVE is a glorious mix of customs and oddities that survive through generations. We are invited to visit for a while. Thanks to Damhnait Monaghan.

 

Learn more about New Girl in Little Cove

SUMMARY

When a new teacher arrives in a tiny fishing village, she realizes the most important lessons are the ones she learns outside the classroom. 

It’s 1985. Rachel O’Brien arrives in Little Cove seeking a fresh start after her father dies and her relationship ends. As a new teacher at the local Catholic high school, Rachel chafes against the small community, where everyone seems to know her business. The anonymous notes that keep appearing on her car, telling her to go home, don’t make her feel welcome either. 

Still, Rachel is quickly drawn into the island’s distinctive music and culture, as well as the lives of her students and fellow teacher, Doug Bishop. As Rachel begins to bond with her students, her feelings for Doug also begin to grow. Rachel tries to ignore her emotions because Doug is in a long-distance relationship with his high school sweetheart. Or is he? 

Eventually, Rachel’s beliefs clash with church and community, and she makes a decision that throws her career into jeopardy. In trying to help a student, has she gone too far? Only the intervention of the ‘Holy Dusters,’ local women who hook rugs and clean the church, can salvage Rachel’s job as well as her chance at a future with Doug.

    

Excerpt

September 1985 

Little Cove: Population 389 

The battered sign came into view as my car crested a hill on the gravel road. Only 389 people? Damn. I pulled over and got out of the car, inhaling the moist air. Empty boats tilted against the wind in the bay below. A big church dominated the valley, beside which squatted a low, red building, its windows dark, like a row of rotten teeth. This was likely St. Jude’s, where tomorrow I would begin my teaching career. 

“You lost?” 

I whirled around. A gaunt man, about sixty, straddled a bike beside me. He wore denim overalls and his white hair was combed neatly back from his forehead. 

“Car broke down?” he continued. 

“No,” I said. “I’m just … ” My voice trailed off. I could hardly confide my second thoughts to this stranger. “…admiring the view.”

He looked past me at the flinty mist now spilling across the bay. A soft rain began to fall, causing my carefully straightened hair to twist and curl like a mass of dark slugs. 

“Might want to save that for a fine day,” he said. His accent was strong, but lilting. “It’s right mauzy today.” 
“Mossy?” 

“Mauzy.” He gestured at the air around him. Then he folded his arms across his chest and gave me a once-over. “Now then,” he said. “What’s a young one like you doing out this way?” 

“I’m not that young,” I shot back. “I’m the new French teacher out here.” 

A smile softened his wrinkled face. “Down from Canada, hey?” 

As far as I knew, Newfoundland was still part of Canada, but I nodded. 

“Phonse Flynn,” he said, holding out a callused hand. “I’m the janitor over to St. Jude’s.” 

“Rachel,” I said. “Rachel O’Brien.” 

“I knows you’re staying with Lucille,” he said. “I’ll show you where she’s at.” 

With an agility that belied his age, he dismounted and gently lowered his bike to the ground. Then he pointed across the bay. “Lucille’s place is over there, luh.” 

Above a sagging wharf, I saw a path that cut through the rocky landscape towards a smattering of houses. I’d been intrigued at the prospect of a boarding house; it sounded Dickensian. Now I was uneasy. What if it was awful? 

“What about your bike?” I asked, as Phonse was now standing by the passenger-side door of my car.

“Ah, sure it’s grand here,” he said. “I’ll come back for it by and by.” 

“Aren’t you going to lock it?” 

I thought of all the orphaned bike wheels locked to racks in Toronto, their frames long since ripped away. Jake had been livid when his racing bike was stolen. Not that I was thinking about Jake. I absolutely was not. 

“No need to lock anything ’round here,” said Phonse. 

I fumbled with my car keys, embarrassed to have locked the car from habit. 

“Need some help?”

“The lock’s a bit stiff,” I said. “I’ll get used to it.” 

Phonse waited while I jiggled in vain. Then he walked around and held out his hand. I gave him the key, he stuck it in and the knob on the inside of the car door popped up immediately. 

“Handyman, see,” he said. “Wants a bit of oil, I allows. But like I said, no need to lock ’er. Anyway, with that colour, who’d steal it?” I had purchased the car over the phone, partly for its price, partly for its colour. Green had been Dad’s favourite colour, and when the salesman said mountain green, I’d imagined a dark, verdant shade. Instead, with its scattered rust garnishes, the car looked like a bowl of mint chocolate chip ice cream. Still, it would fit right in. I eyeballed the houses as we drove along: garish orange, lime green, blinding yellow. Maybe there had been a sale on paint. 

As we passed the church, Phonse blessed himself, fingers moving from forehead to chest, then on to each shoulder. I kept both hands firmly on the steering wheel. 

“Where’s the main part of Little Cove?” I asked. 

“You’re looking at it.”

There was nothing but a gas station and a takeout called MJ’s, where a clump of teenagers was gathered outside, smoking. A tall, dark-haired boy pointed at my car and they all turned to stare. A girl in a lumber jacket raised her hand. I waved back before I realized she was giving me the finger. Embarrassed, I peeked sideways at Phonse. If he’d noticed, he didn’t let on. 

Although Phonse was passenger to my driver, I found myself thinking of Matthew Cuthbert driving Anne Shirley through Avonlea en route to Green Gables. Not that I’d be assigning romantic names to these landmarks. Anne’s “Snow Queen” cherry tree and “Lake of Shining Waters” were nowhere to be seen. It was more like Stunted Fir Tree and Sea of Grey Mist. And I wasn’t a complete orphan; it merely felt that way. 

At the top of a hill, Phonse pointed to a narrow dirt driveway on the right. “In there, luh.” 

I parked in front of a small violet house encircled by a crooked wooden fence. A rusty oil tank leaned into the house, as if seeking shelter. When I got out, my nose wrinkled at the fishy smell. Phonse joined me at the back of the car and reached into the trunk for my suitcases. 

“Gentle Jaysus in the garden,” he grunted. “What have you got in here at all? Bricks?” He lurched ahead of me towards the house, refusing my offer of help. 

The contents of my suitcases had to last me the entire year; now I was second-guessing my choices. My swimsuit and goggles? I wouldn’t be doing lengths in the ocean. I looked at the mud clinging to my sneakers and regretted the suede dress boots nestled in tissue paper. But I knew some of my decisions had been right: a raincoat, my portable cassette player, stacks of homemade tapes, my hair straighteners and a slew of books. 

When Phonse reached the door, he pushed it open, calling, “Lucille? I got the new teacher here. I expect she’s wore out from the journey.” As he heaved my bags inside, a stout woman in a floral apron and slippers appeared: Lucille Hanrahan, my boarding house lady. 

“Phonse, my son, bring them bags upstairs for me now,” she said. 

I said I would take them but Lucille shooed me into the hall, practically flapping her tea towel at me. “No, girl,” she said. “You must be dropping, all the way down from Canada. Let’s get some grub in you before you goes over to the school to see Mr. Donovan.” 

Patrick Donovan, the school principal, had interviewed me over the phone. I was eager to meet him. 

“Oh, did he call?” I asked. 

“No.” 

Lucille smoothed her apron over her belly, then called up the stairs to ask Phonse if he wanted a cup of tea. There was a slow beat of heavy boots coming down. “I’ll not stop this time,” said Phonse. “But Lucille, that fence needs seeing to.” 

Lucille batted her hand at him. “Go way with you,” she said. “It’s been falling down these twenty years or more.” But as she showed him out, they talked about possible repairs, the two of them standing outside, pointing and gesturing, oblivious to the falling rain. 

A lump of mud fell from my sneaker, and I sat down on the bottom step to remove my shoes. When Lucille returned, she grabbed the pair, clacked them together outside the door to remove the remaining mud, then lined them up beside a pair of sturdy ankle boots. 

I followed her down the hall to the kitchen, counting the curlers that dotted her head, pink outposts in a field of black and grey.

“Sit down over there, luh,” she said, gesturing towards a table and chairs shoved against the back window. I winced at her voice; it sounded like the classic two-pack-a-day rasp. 

The fog had thickened, so nothing was visible outside; it was like watching static on TV. There were scattered cigarette burns on the vinyl tablecloth and worn patches on the linoleum floor. A religious calendar hung on the wall, a big red circle around today’s date. September’s pin-up was Mary, her veil the exact colour of Lucille’s house. I was deep in Catholic territory, all right. I hoped I could still pass for one.


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