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April showers are here, settle with a great read!

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The Lute And The Liar
Rie Sheridan

Awe-Struck
May 2007
On Sale: April 27, 2007
210 pages
ISBN: 1587496305
EAN: 9781587496301
Paperback
Add to Wish List

Fantasy

In two weeks apprentice bard, Mordigan Bryre will come of age, and receive his coveted Journeyman's papers. He is gifted with an angel's voice -- and cursed with a liar's tongue. A mysterious witch makes him a bargain, if he seeks out the wizard Talthos, he will receive a magical lute that will make him a legend. The catch? If he lies along the way, he will risk losing his golden voice. Dismissed in disgrace from his Guild Hall, what does he have to lose? Princess Allysian has been in love with Mordigan Bryre all her life. How can she let him set off alone? But how can she follow? True love will find a way, and some things are worth any sacrifice.

Comments

30 comments posted.

Re: The Lute And The Liar

Your books are great and very interesting :)
(Katie Smith 8:50pm October 5, 2009)

This book sounds great. I look forward in reading it.

Thanks.
(
Tracey Dent 5:06am October 7, 2009)

This is so true! It never hurts to go outside of your comfort zone.
(
Codie Smith 8:41am October 7, 2009)

I love fantasy novels, something to escape with. This one sounds great!
(
Mary Lynn Hayes 11:28am October 7, 2009)

I love your way of thinking!
(
Cathie Veres 12:04pm October 7, 2009)

I agree, nice way of stating it, Rie. I try to
write what I hope enchants because that
is what I love. Not sure that made sense
LOL
(
Sheri McGathy 12:55pm October 7, 2009)

Great advice!
(
Shannon Scott 12:56pm October 7, 2009)

Thanks for the lovely comments, everyone. If anyone has any questions, let me know -- and drop a line if you need a copy of BUILDING A THREE-LEGGED STOOL. :)
(
Rie Sheridan Rose 1:18pm October 7, 2009)

Very helpful chat. My ideas are children's book, so even though I know children I do not know how to write for them yet. I'm in the learning and research stage.
(
Theresa Buckholtz 1:35pm October 7, 2009)

Would love to win the book as I have not read any of yours. I would review it too.
I have thought about writing but it seems so complicated to break into it and it seems I never have time for anything but running for my youngest daughter who does not live at home. Her car is broken down. I would not be interested in the ebook - only the printed book.
(
Jane Squires 1:57pm October 7, 2009)

The main thing about writing for kids, Theresa (my illustrators are still working on my children's books) is to write simple words for concepts without talking down to your readers. And I personally think that throwing in a new word for them now and then is a good thing. :)
(
Rie Sheridan Rose 2:32pm October 7, 2009)

I would love to win one of your books.
(
Patsy Hagen 2:34pm October 7, 2009)

Sounds very intriguing! Been awhile since I've read one along these lines...
(
Ivy Truitt 3:08pm October 7, 2009)

I appreciate this blog! I've always wanted to be a writer but have several reasons I don't pursue that. First, I am terrible about figuring out where I want to put paragraph breaks and such (most letters I write are one LONG paragraph LOL). Also, there is NO time for myself between dealing with a 13 year old, a two year old, a 10 month old great dane puppy, and housework. I hardly have time to sleep! Finally, I doubt I'd have the creativity necessary to be published.
I love your advice though! If I ever did attempt to write it would definitely be paranormal and the standard advice certainly does not apply to that genre. Your advice is certainly more helpful!
Regardless of whether I win one of your books I definitely plan on reading them. Particularly because it is in my preferred genre. Thank you for sharing and for the opportunity to win!
(
Dawn Detkowski 3:43pm October 7, 2009)

It looks like you've have taken part in a few RenFests. I have wrote stories all my life; dreaming to one day to become a writer. I read and write in many different genre. I would love to win one of your books. They sound exciting!
(
Lisa Glidewell 4:09pm October 7, 2009)

Dawn -- I hear where you are coming from. Sometimes finding time to write seems impossible. One thing you can do is to carry a small pocket-sized notebook with you everywhere. Then, if you have a few minutes, you can jot down a little bit. Waiting in line can become prime writing time. And if you aren't ready to actually write the story, you can still jot down names, plot ideas, setting thoughts, etc. As far as the long paragraphs and punctuation, you can always find editors to help with that. Good luck!
(
Rie Sheridan Rose 4:12pm October 7, 2009)

To experience life, I believe that every now and then you have to get out of your comfort zone. Try it, you might just like it. And you are then usually tempted to try something else. It's a stepping stone to bigger and better things. I think this probably applies to writing too.
(
DeeAnn Szymanski 4:13pm October 7, 2009)

True, DeeAnn. I agree that one should constantly be learning and expanding their experiences. My point is just that it is literally impossible to encounter or experience some of the things that speculative fiction writers write about. That doesn't mean we shouldn't try. :)
(
Rie Sheridan Rose 4:22pm October 7, 2009)

So, your imagination is the limit!
(
Kelli Jo Calvert 5:25pm October 7, 2009)

Rie Sheridan Rose: Thank you for your article.

I've long had trouble with the adage "Write what you know"---at least in its shallow, literal sense. For many of us, it's impossible to apply. And I don't just mean authors of fantasy, science fiction, and historical fiction.

I mean writers like me who don't have and have never had anything going on in their lives worth transforming into fiction. And if a subject doesn't interest the writer, how can it be expected to interest the readers?

However, if we go into the deeper, more figurative meaning of "Write what you know," it becomes more relevant. Writers can make like method actors and incorporate emotions and basic situations they know first-hand in their works.

Still, there are times when the imagination must take over and research must back it up. And though there is much I don't know, there's nothing I can't find out!

Dawn Detkowski: I believe everyone has inside at least one story worth telling. Not everyone tries to get it on paper or in pixels.

But if it's at all possible, I urge your to tell yours, then try to find your readers. They're out there for every writer. Reaching them is just a matter of time, effort, and persistence.
(
Mary Anne Landers 5:32pm October 7, 2009)

Rie Sheridan Rose: Thank you for your article.

I've long had trouble with the adage "Write what you know"---at least in its shallow, literal sense. For many of us, it's impossible to apply. And I don't just mean authors of fantasy, science fiction, and historical fiction.

I mean writers like me who don't have and have never had anything going on in their lives worth transforming into fiction. And if a subject doesn't interest the writer, how can it be expected to interest the readers?

However, if we go into the deeper, more figurative meaning of "Write what you know," it becomes more relevant. Writers can make like method actors and incorporate emotions and basic situations they know first-hand in their works.

Still, there are times when the imagination must take over and research must back it up. And though there is much I don't know, there's nothing I can't find out!

Dawn Detkowski: I believe everyone has inside at least one story worth telling. Not everyone tries to get it on paper or in pixels.

But if it's at all possible, I urge your to tell yours, then try to find your readers. They're out there for every writer. Reaching them is just a matter of time, effort, and persistence.
(
Mary Anne Landers 5:34pm October 7, 2009)

Exactly, Kelli Jo!

And Lisa and Jane -- the notebook advice I gave Dawn would work for you too. My notebook is on the table beside me right now, and last night I wrote half a story in it. Never be afraid to follow your dreams. :)
(
Rie Sheridan Rose 5:37pm October 7, 2009)

Beautifully said, Mary Anne. You are right that this advice can apply to all writers. I just tend to stick to the fantastic myself. I think part of it is that this is MY comfort zone. Though I have been contemplating trying a historical...
(
Rie Sheridan Rose 5:41pm October 7, 2009)

I love books. All kinds of books. I've never committed murder, but I love reading a good murder mystery and I hope the author hasn't committed murder just to "write what they know". I totally agree with you. A good imagination and the love of history (along with the ability to do research) always makes for a more interesting project.
(
Mitzi Hinkey 5:54pm October 7, 2009)

I actually have a short story investigating just that concept titled "Write What You Know" in RieVisions, my short story collection from Mundania Press, Mitzi.
(
Rie Sheridan Rose 6:02pm October 7, 2009)

Looks like a good read. I really enjoy reading fantasy
(
Teresa Ward 8:25pm October 7, 2009)

I found your post very interesting. You are correct. We have a world of knowledge at our fingertips and we should use it to expand our horizons.
(
Rosemary Krejsa 9:35pm October 7, 2009)

I like the way you look at writing a book - it allow the imagination to run rampant & come up with some interesting writing.
(
Cheryl Snyder 11:02pm October 7, 2009)

A very interesting thought. I had never applied it to speculative fiction, probably because I'm not a writer and have problems with ideas outside my realm of logic. I like reading books about subjects that are unknown to me: about different countries and people that are different from me. This applies to books about both foreign countries and imagined ones. I enjoy all of them.
(
Sigrun Schulz 12:15pm October 9, 2009)

You are so right. The old saying "write what you know" really doesn't apply to what so many writers are doing today. The paranormal genre is only one example. Good research and/or a good imagination can fill in a lot of blanks and open a lot of doors for both author and reader.
Good luck with your books.
(
Patricia Barraclough 12:19pm October 9, 2009)

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