March 1st, 2021
Home | Log in!

On Top Shelf
LORD SATYRLORD SATYR
Fresh Pick
A FATAL LIE
A FATAL LIE

New Books This Week

Latest Articles


Grab your best read in March!

Slideshow image


Since your web browser does not support JavaScript, here is a non-JavaScript version of the image slideshow:

slideshow image
A gift from the gods…
Can unleash hell…
in a thrilling Night Rebel novel


slideshow image
They’re hunting a killer so silent, so invisible, that his unspeakable crimes are the only proof he exists.


slideshow image
Second-chance romance about love, loss, finding yourself, and getting lost in the right person.


slideshow image
Wise and witty novel about a fired advice columnist who discovers lost and found family members in Charleston


slideshow image
Paranormal Women's Fantasy
KindleUnlimited


slideshow image
Every bloody thread has been leading to this . . .


slideshow image
Can an awkward bluestocking transform into a beauty?


Noopiming: The Cure for White Ladies
Leanne Betasamosake Simpson

Univ Of Minnesota Press
February 2021
On Sale: February 9, 2021
368 pages
ISBN: 1517911257
EAN: 9781517911256
Hardcover
Add to Wish List

Multicultural African-American

The new novel from the author of As We Have Always Done, a poetic world-building journey into the power of Anishinaabe life and traditions amid colonialism
 

In fierce prose and poetic fragments, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson’s Noopiming braids together humor, piercing detail, and a deep, abiding commitment to Anishinaabe life to tell stories of resistance, love, and joy.

Mashkawaji (they/them) lies frozen in the ice, remembering the sharpness of unmuted feeling from long ago, finding freedom and solace in isolated suspension. They introduce the seven characters: Akiwenzii, the old man who represents the narrator’s will; Ninaatig, the maple tree who represents their lungs; Mindimooyenh, the old woman, their conscience; Sabe, a gentle giant, their marrow; Adik, the caribou, their nervous system; and Asin and Lucy, the humans who represent their eyes, ears, and brain.

Simpson’s book As We Have Always Done argued for the central place of storytelling in imagining radical futures. Noopiming (Anishinaabemowin for “in the bush”) enacts these ideas. The novel’s characters emerge from deep within Abinhinaabeg thought to commune beyond an unnatural urban-settler world littered with SpongeBob Band-Aids, Ziploc baggies, and Fjällräven Kånken backpacks. A bold literary act of decolonization and resistance, Noopiming offers a breaking open of the self to a world alive with people, animals, ancestors, and spirits—and the daily work of healing.

Comments

No comments posted.

Registered users may leave comments.
Log in or register now!

© 2003-2021 off-the-edge.net  all rights reserved Privacy Policy