July 15th, 2020
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Hot, sizzling reads for July

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Cowboys who thrill outside the arena as much as in.


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Spy school for young ladies in Jane Austen’s world.


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He’d give his life for her, but his heart was never part of the bargain


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Can happily ever after exist somewhere between virtue and valor?


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With his K-9 partner at his side, can he survive false accusations and a bomber?


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Two people inexplicably drawn to each other even though they have almost nothing in common.


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Rogues & Remarkable Women


Cockeyed by Ryan Knighton

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Also by Ryan Knighton:

Cockeyed, June 2006
Hardcover

Cockeyed
Ryan Knighton

This irreverent, tragicomic, astoundingly articulate memoir about going blind--and growing up--illuminates both the author's reality and our own

PublicAffairs
June 2006
288 pages
ISBN: 1586483293
Hardcover
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Non-Fiction Memoir

On his 18th birthday, Ryan Knighton was diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa, a congenital, progressive disease marked by night-blindness, tunnel vision and, eventually, total blindness. In this penetrating, nervy memoir, which ricochets between meditation and black comedy, Knighton tells the story of his fifteen-year descent into blindness while incidentally revealing the world of the sighted in all its phenomenal peculiarity.

Knighton learns to drive while unseeing; has his first significant relationship-with a deaf woman; navigates the punk rock scene and men's washrooms; learns to use a cane; and tries to pass for seeing while teaching English to children in Korea. Stumbling literally and emotionally into darkness, into love, into couch-shopping at Ikea, into adulthood, and into truce if not acceptance of his identity as a blind man, his writerly self uses his disability to provide a window onto the human condition. His experience of blindness offers unexpected insights into sight and the other senses, culture, identity, language, our fears and fantasies.

Cockeyed is not a conventional confessional. Knighton is powerful and irreverent in words and thought and impatient with the preciousness we've come to expect from books on disability. Readers will find it hard to put down this wild ride around their everyday world with a wicked, smart, blind guide at the wheel.

Media Buzz

This American Life - May 19, 2012
Talk of the Nation - May 31, 2006

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