March 22nd, 2019
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Twelve Days of Christmas

Day 1 - Christmas

Christmas is a secular and religious holiday celebrated around the world. It includes gift giving, candle lighting (and lighted displays), singing, plays, decorations and more. We're kicking off our Twelve days or Christmastide by showcasing special giveaways each day.

Day 1 is Christmas: (from Wikipedia)

Etymology
"Christmas" is a shortened form of "Christ's mass". It is derived from the Middle English Cristemasse, which is from Old English Crīstesmęsse, a phrase first recorded in 1038 followed by the word Cristes-messe in 1131.[32] Crīst (genitive Crīstes) is from Greek Khrīstos (Χριστός), a translation of Hebrew Māšīaḥ (מָשִׁיחַ), "Messiah", meaning "anointed"; and męsse is from Latin missa, the celebration of the Eucharist.

The form Christenmas was also historically used, but is now considered archaic and dialectal; it derives from Middle English Cristenmasse, literally "Christian mass". Xmas is an abbreviation of Christmas found particularly in print, based on the initial letter chi (Χ) in Greek Khrīstos (Χριστός), "Christ", though numerous style guides discourage its use; it has precedent in Middle English Χρ̄es masse (where "Χρ̄" is an abbreviation for Χριστός).

Other names
In addition to "Christmas", the holiday has been known by various other names throughout its history. The Anglo-Saxons referred to the feast as "midwinter", or, more rarely, as Nātiuiteš (from Latin nātīvitās below). "Nativity", meaning "birth", is from Latin nātīvitās. In Old English, Gēola (Yule) referred to the period corresponding to December and January, which was eventually equated with Christian Christmas. "Noel" (or "Nowel") entered English in the late 14th century and is from the Old French noėl or naėl, itself ultimately from the Latin nātālis (diēs) meaning "birth (day)".

What is your favorite Christmas custom?

 

 

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