April 19th, 2018
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D.B. ReynoldsD.B. Reynolds
Fresh Fiction
Fresh Pick
Todays_Pick
THE SAINT OF WOLVES AND BUTCHERS

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Read some great books in April...you'll be blooming!

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Not every match is made in the marriage mart...Some happen when you least expect it.


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Contemporary romance set in Seattle's Pioneer Square.


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MYSTERY PICK OF THE MONTH! –Library Journal (Starred Review)


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Journey to an irresistible town you’ll want to return to over and over again.


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She was the last woman he wanted in his life. . .and the one he needed the most.


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Romantic Times says The Bride Next Door “is a laugh out-loud, play-on-words dramathon…”


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Pursued by a dangerous terrorist, U.S. Deputy Marshal Casey Sloane, along with two other Marshals, put their lives on the line to deliver a federal witness to the FBI.



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Also by Claudia Emerson:

Late Wife, October 2005
Paperback
Pinion, February 2002
Trade Size
Pharaoh, Pharaoh, May 1997
Hardcover

Pinion
Claudia Emerson

An Elegy

Southern Messenger Poets
Louisiana State University Press
February 2002
55 pages
ISBN: 0807127655
Trade Size
$16.95
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Fiction Poetry

In this eloquent long poem, Claudia Emerson employs the voices of two family members on a small southern farm to examine the universal complexities of place, generation, memory, and identity. Alternating between the voices of Preacher and Sister, Pinion is narrated by the younger, surviving sister Rose, in whose memory the now-gone family and farm vividly live on.

Sister tells of her observances in day-to-day life in the 1920s and her struggle to take care of her father, grown brothers, and Rose-"the change of-life-baby"-after the death of her mother: "The hens had hidden their heads beneath / their wings; they blinded themselves as I dusted / the kneading bowl with flour sifted fine as silk, and so / I disappeared as I sank my fists into it." Preacher feels keenly the burden of running the farm and fears being the last one to live on the place: "I was held fast there, pinioned, not / dying, growing numb and light, wait-crazed / and finally calm." Both wrestle with a desire for independence and the duty to home they are bound to by birth; neither marries or leaves.

Pinion is ultimately a wrenching elegy that Rose creates. She is the one who escaped, only to realize, "I survive them all, but I find I have become the house they keep."

Media Buzz

NewsHour with Jim Lehrer - May 4, 2006

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