February 24th, 2018
Home | Log in! or Register

On Top Shelf
STINGSTING
Fresh Fiction
Fresh Pick
Todays_Pick
THE WOMAN IN THE WINDOW

Reviewer Application


Hearts and Love, great reads in February

Slideshow image


Since your web browser does not support JavaScript, here is a non-JavaScript version of the image slideshow:

slideshow image
THE DELANEYS OF SANDPIPER BEACH: A family business with room to grow.


slideshow image
So many frogs. So few princes.


slideshow image
Eloisa loves a Cinderella twist in her stories, and three short stories with this theme are digitally publishing in one volume!


slideshow image
Marie Bostwick weaves together the unforgettable story of four very different women whose paths cross, changing their lives forever…


slideshow image
When someone attempts to assassinate a Saudi Prince on U.S. soil, FBI Agent Kord Davidson and CIA Operative Monica Alden head up a task force to keep the Prince safe and find those responsible to avoid an international incident that could have devastating consequences.


slideshow image
Working late has its rewards



Purchase

Add to Wish List


Also by Conrad Richter:

The Fields, November 2017
Trade Size
The Trees, November 2017
Trade Size
The Town, November 2017
Trade Size

The Fields
Conrad Richter

Chicago Review Press
November 2017
On Sale: November 1, 2017
304 pages
ISBN: 1613737424
EAN: 9781613737422
Kindle: B01CWZFC8U
Trade Size / e-Book
Add to Wish List

Fiction

Of this second novel in Conrad Richter’s great trilogy, Louis Bromfield wrote:

“The Fields continues the life of Sayward after her strange marriage to the ‘educated’ New Englander Portious, through the raising of their family of eight children. But it is much more than that; it is also the tale of the slow battle and eventual victory over the Trees and that relentless forest which even today marches in and takes over an Ohio field that has been left untilled for a year or two. Bit by bit, through hard work and in hardship, the forest is conquered and the villages emerge into the light surrounded by fields of great fertility. . . . “The story is told with a feeling of poetry and the picturesque turn of language which characterized the speech of the frontier and can still be heard in the Ohio country districts . . . Sayward, the heroine, is the portrait of a simple, eternal woman dominating in an instinctive way a husband who is far more educated and subtle than herself. The children are real children, each with his own personality. . . .

Comments

No comments posted.

Registered users may leave comments.
Log in or register now!

© 2003-2018 off-the-edge.net
all rights reserved

Google+ Google+