January 23rd, 2018
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New Year, New Books to love in January

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A broken promise, a terrifying legacy


More Human than Human
Neil Clarke


Night Shade Books
November 2017
On Sale: November 7, 2017
672 pages
ISBN: 1597809144
EAN: 9781597809146
Kindle: B073BMGYQ4
Trade Size / e-Book
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Science Fiction

Clarkesworld publisher Neil Clarke collects a reprint anthology of artificial human-themed short fiction.

The idea of creating an artificial human is an old one. One of the earliest science-fictional novels, Frankenstein, concerned itself primarily with the hubris of creation, and one’s relationship to one’s creator. Later versions of this “artificial human” story (and indeed later adaptations of Frankenstein) changed the focus to more modernist questions… What is the nature of humanity? What does it mean to be human?

These stories continued through the golden age of science fiction with Isaac Asimov’s I Robot story cycle, and then through post-modern iterations from new wave writers like Philip K. Dick. Today, this compelling science fiction trope persists in mass media narratives like Westworld and Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner, as well as twenty-first century science fiction novels like Charles Stross’s Saturn's Children and Paolo Bacigalupi’s The Windup Girl.

The short stories in More Human than Human demonstrate the depth and breadth of artificial humanity in contemporary science fiction. Issues of passing . . . of what it is to be human . . . of autonomy and slavery and oppression, and yes, the hubris of creation; these ideas have fascinated us for at least two hundred years, and this selection of stories demonstrates why it is such an alluring and recurring conceit.

Comments

1 comment posted.

Re: More Human than Human

This sounds like an interesting read. I've not read
traditional science fiction in years but this could do it!
Thanks.
(Kathleen Bylsma 3:23pm November 9)

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