October 18th, 2017
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Kathy LyonsKathy Lyons
Fresh Fiction
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DUKE OF DESIRE

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Suspense, thrills and love in October Best Reads

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If only life came with instructions.


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There is nothing in the universe the cursed dragon, Falcyn, hates more than humanity . . . except Greek humans.


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No bodices were harmed in this historical romance.


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Together we'll save the world...Unless we kill each other first.


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“The Wrath Is Coming.” But They Don’T Know Where—Or When.


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PREORDER this sexy & emotional story about a single dad wild with grief and the strong survivor he hires as his nanny!


Ctrl + Z
Meg Leta Jones

The Right To Be Forgotten

NYU Press
April 2016
On Sale: March 29, 2016
256 pages
ISBN: 1479881708
EAN: 9781479881703
Kindle: B0171WAFUO
Hardcover / e-Book
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Non-Fiction Philosphy | Non-Fiction

“This is going on your permanent record!” is a threat that has never held more weight than it does in the Internet Age, when information lasts indefinitely. The ability to make good on that threat is as democratized as posting a Tweet or making blog. Data about us is created, shared, collected, analyzed, and processed at an overwhelming scale. The damage caused can be severe, affecting relationships, employment, academic success, and any number of other opportunities—and it can also be long lasting.

One possible solution to this threat? A digital right to be forgotten, which would in turn create a legal duty to delete, hide, or anonymize information at the request of another user. The highly controversial right has been criticized as a repugnant affront to principles of expression and access, as unworkable as a technical measure, and as effective as trying to put the cat back in the bag. Ctrl+Z breaks down the debate and provides guidance for a way forward. It argues that the existing perspectives are too limited, offering easy forgetting or none at all. By looking at new theories of privacy and organizing the many potential applications of the right, law and technology scholar Meg Leta Jones offers a set of nuanced choices. To help us choose, she provides a digital information life cycle, reflects on particular legal cultures, and analyzes international interoperability. In the end, the right to be forgotten can be innovative, liberating, and globally viable.

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