February 25th, 2018
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THE DRY WELL

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Hearts and Love, great reads in February

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THE DELANEYS OF SANDPIPER BEACH: A family business with room to grow.


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So many frogs. So few princes.


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Eloisa loves a Cinderella twist in her stories, and three short stories with this theme are digitally publishing in one volume!


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Marie Bostwick weaves together the unforgettable story of four very different women whose paths cross, changing their lives forever…


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When someone attempts to assassinate a Saudi Prince on U.S. soil, FBI Agent Kord Davidson and CIA Operative Monica Alden head up a task force to keep the Prince safe and find those responsible to avoid an international incident that could have devastating consequences.


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Working late has its rewards


Ctrl + Z
Meg Leta Jones

The Right To Be Forgotten

NYU Press
April 2016
On Sale: March 29, 2016
256 pages
ISBN: 1479881708
EAN: 9781479881703
Kindle: B0171WAFUO
Hardcover / e-Book
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Non-Fiction Philosphy | Non-Fiction

“This is going on your permanent record!” is a threat that has never held more weight than it does in the Internet Age, when information lasts indefinitely. The ability to make good on that threat is as democratized as posting a Tweet or making blog. Data about us is created, shared, collected, analyzed, and processed at an overwhelming scale. The damage caused can be severe, affecting relationships, employment, academic success, and any number of other opportunities—and it can also be long lasting.

One possible solution to this threat? A digital right to be forgotten, which would in turn create a legal duty to delete, hide, or anonymize information at the request of another user. The highly controversial right has been criticized as a repugnant affront to principles of expression and access, as unworkable as a technical measure, and as effective as trying to put the cat back in the bag. Ctrl+Z breaks down the debate and provides guidance for a way forward. It argues that the existing perspectives are too limited, offering easy forgetting or none at all. By looking at new theories of privacy and organizing the many potential applications of the right, law and technology scholar Meg Leta Jones offers a set of nuanced choices. To help us choose, she provides a digital information life cycle, reflects on particular legal cultures, and analyzes international interoperability. In the end, the right to be forgotten can be innovative, liberating, and globally viable.

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