June 25th, 2018
Home | Log in! or Register

On Top Shelf
ROYAL PAINROYAL PAIN
Fresh Fiction
Fresh Pick
Todays_Pick

Reviewer Application

New Books This Week

Latest Articles


Fall in love with June books!

Slideshow image


Since your web browser does not support JavaScript, here is a non-JavaScript version of the image slideshow:

slideshow image
Just when things are getting back to normal in Booktown, Tricia and Angelica have their lives turned upside down...


slideshow image
"A fantastic frenemies-to-forever love story" --RT Book Reviews


slideshow image
Blood might be thicker than water, but venom is stronger than just about anything...


slideshow image
Brant Wylder has planned for every eventuality. Becoming a father wasn't on his list.


slideshow image
A brand new spin-off from NY Times & USA Today bestselling romance series, The Billionaire's Obsession.


slideshow image
In another life there was love and war. From it, a single sin haunts one man.



Purchase

Add to Wish List


Also by Chris Matthews:

Tip and the Gipper, October 2013
Hardcover
Jack Kennedy, November 2011
Hardcover
The Hardball Handbook, April 2009
Paperback
Life's a Campaign, October 2007
Hardcover

Tip and the Gipper
Chris Matthews

When Politics Worked

Simon & Schuster
October 2013
On Sale: October 1, 2013
450 pages
ISBN: 1451695993
EAN: 9781451695991
Kindle: B00BSB2DBO
Hardcover / e-Book
Add to Wish List

Non-Fiction Biography | Non-Fiction Political

TIP AND THE GIPPER is a magnificent personal history of a time when two great political opponents served together for the benefit of the country. Chris Matthews was an eyewitness to this story as a top aide to Speaker of the House Tip O’Neill, who waged a principled war of political ideals with President Reagan from 1980 to 1986. Together, the two men forged compromises that shaped America’s future and became one of history’s most celebrated political pairings—the epitome of how ideological opposites can get things done.

When Ronald Reagan was elected to the presidency in a landslide victory over Jimmy Carter (for whom Matthews had worked as a speechwriter), Speaker O’Neill realized Americans had voted for a change. For the first time in his career, O’Neill also found himself thrust into the national spotlight as the highest-ranking leader of the Democratic Party—the most visible and respected challenger to President Reagan’s agenda of shrinking the government and lowering taxes.

At first, O’Neill doubted his ability to compete on the public stage with the charming Hollywood actor, whose polished speeches played well on TV, a medium O’Neill had never mastered. Over time, the burly Irishman learned how to fight the popular president on his key issues, relying on legislative craftiness, strong rhetoric, and even guerrilla theater. “An old dog can learn new tricks,” Tip told his staff. Of O’Neill, one of his colleagues said, “If Martians came into the House chamber, they’d know instantly who the leader was.”

Meanwhile, President Reagan proved to be a much more effective and savvy leader than his rivals had ever expected, achieving major legislative victories on taxes and the federal budget. Reagan and his allies knew how to work the levers of power in Washington. After showing remarkable personal fortitude in the wake of the assassination attempt against him, Reagan never let his political differences with Democrats become personal. He was fond of the veteran Speaker’s motto that political battles ended at 6 p.m. So when he would phone O’Neill, he would say, “Hello, Tip, is it after six o’clock?”

Together, the two leaders fought over the major issues of the day—welfare, taxes, covert military operations, and Social Security—but found their way to agreements that reformed taxes, saved Social Security, and achieved their common cause of bringing peace to Northern Ireland. O’Neill’s quiet behind-the-scenes support helped Reagan forge his historic Cold War–ending bond with Mikhail Gor­bachev. They each won some and lost some, and through it all they maintained respect for each other’s positions and worked to advance the country rather than obstruct progress.

As Matthews notes, “There is more than one sort of heroic behavior, and they don’t all look the same.” Tip and the Gipper is the story of the kind of heroism we need today.

Media Buzz

The View - January 14, 2014
Today - November 23, 2013
Rachael Madow - October 14, 2013
Colbert Report - October 14, 2013
Colbert Report - October 2, 2013
Today - October 1, 2013
Fresh Air - NPR - October 1, 2013
Meet the Press - September 29, 2013

Comments

No comments posted.

Registered users may leave comments.
Log in or register now!

© 2003-2018 off-the-edge.net  all rights reserved Privacy Policy

Google+ Google+