December 13th, 2019
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Finish off the year with great December reads

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New York Times bestseller Cleo Coyle's "delightfully twisty" new Coffeehouse Mystery.


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She’s hiding from killers. Can she find a safe haven in Amish country?


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With a heart torn between two men and two cities, what’s a girl to do?


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Goode girls don’t lie…


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Will an abandoned child bring them together? Or tear them apart?


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This SEAL turned sheriff realizes there’s no rule or regulation he won’t break to keep his love safe.


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He’s Hollywood’s hottest heartthrob…and her son’s secret father.


Ok
Allan Metcalf

The Improbable Story of America's Greatest Word

Oxford University Press
November 2010
On Sale: November 9, 2010
224 pages
ISBN: 0195377931
EAN: 9780195377934
Hardcover
$18.95
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Non-Fiction

It is said to be the most frequently spoken (or typed) word on the planet, more common than an infant's first word ma or the ever-present beverage Coke. It was even the first word spoken on the moon. It is "OK"-- the most ubiquitous and invisible of American expressions, one used countless times every day. Yet few of us know the secret history of OK--how it was coined, what it stood for, and the amazing extent of its influence.

Allan Metcalf, a renowned popular writer on language, here traces the evolution of America's most popular word, writing with brevity and wit, and ranging across American history with colorful portraits of the nooks and crannies in which OK survived and prospered. He describes how OK was born as a lame joke in a newspaper article in 1839--used as a supposedly humorous abbreviation for "oll korrect" (ie, "all correct")--but should have died a quick death, as most clever coinages do. But OK was swept along in a nineteenth-century fad for abbreviations, was appropriated by a presidential campaign (one of the candidates being called "Old Kinderhook"), and finally was picked up by operators of the telegraph. Over the next century and a half, it established a firm toehold in the American lexicon, and eventually became embedded in pop culture, from the "I'm OK, You're OK" of 1970's transactional analysis, to Ned Flanders' absurd "Okeley Dokeley!" Indeed, OK became emblematic of a uniquely American attitude, and is one of our most successful global exports.

Anyone who loves the life of words or the quirky corners of American culture will find this delightful book more than just OK.

Media Buzz

CBS Sunday Morning - March 16, 2014
All Things Considered - November 21, 2010

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